Category Archives: Misc Crafts

Scheming Colors, Part 2

color wheel

color wheel

In my previous post, I talked about how the hardest part of selecting knitted accessories for my outfits is matching or complementing the colors. I discussed how to use the color wheel, the addition of neutral colors, and the consideration of hue, tone, tint, and shade. I described contrast and monochromatic color schemes. The angles I’ll discuss in this post include: seasonal colors, colors for your skin tone, your body shape, whether it’s casual or formal, and more.

Seasonal Colors. I had a lot of difficulty finding information on this—not because it’s not out there, but because there are a lot of resources for determining how to select colors to your skin tone and your skin tone is defined as “Spring,” “Summer,” “Autumn,” or “Winter.” Nevertheless, generally speaking, colors that you see in nature in the spring (greens, blues, yellows—bright colors) are “Spring” colors; those you see in nature in the summer (spring colors and khaki [think sandy beaches], etc.) plus all lighter colors and white (which keep you cool) are “Summer” colors; those you see in nature in the autumn (orange, yellow, red, brown, etc.) are “Autumn” colors; and those you see in nature in the winter (white, blue, gray or silver, etc.) plus all darker colors and black (which keep you warm) are “Winter” colors. If you’re wearing dark brown, orange, red, and yellow (colors of autumn leaves) in May, it looks out of place.

Skin Tone Colors. With the right colors for your skin tone, your eyes, skin, and hair glow; imperfections are reduced; and you appear bright and alert. With the wrong colors for your skin tone, your eyes, skin, and hair look drained; imperfections are highlighted; and your face fades into the background. Generally, skin tones are divided into four categories (Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter), but the updated typology is based on twelve skin types instead of four To find your skin tone and what colors you can wear, go here for a quick analysis or here for a full analysis.

Body Shape. Dark colors recede, thereby making you look thinner. Light colors project, thereby bulking you up.

Formality. Generally speaking, darker colors are more formal than lighter colors.

Warm and Cool. Warm colors include red, orange, and yellow. Cool colors include green, blue, and violet. Analogous colors are groups of colors that are all warm or all cool. Designers often combine analogous and contrasting colors, such as one cool and two warm or two cool and one warm.

I hope this helped you. It sure helped me!

じゃあまたね!

 

References:

http://stylingscrapbook.wordpress.com/2012/03/05/styling-guide-the-color-wheel-and-color-theory/

http://www.thechicfashionista.com/your-best-perfect-colors.html

http://into-mind.com/2013/09/24/colour-analysis-part-i-finding-your-type/

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Scheming Colors, Part 1

…Or color schemes. Tomayto tomahto.

One of my greatest frustrations with planning to knit a project or trying to correctly use my knitted projects as accessories is color matching. How do I know what items complement each other?

There are many different angles to consider. One is the color wheel, which I’ll discuss in this post, and the others include: seasonal colors, colors for your skin tone, your body shape, whether it’s casual or formal, and more. These other concepts I’ll discuss in a future post.

First: the color wheel. I tried looking for various apps that would help you use the color wheel, but couldn’t find one that did what I wanted it to do. :-/ So here’s an explanation.

basic color wheel

basic color wheel, (c) Takeshi Ugajin

Take a basic color wheel, like the one pictured here. Select your main or dominant color—that is, the color of the principal item in your outfit. Let’s say, for example, that I’m going to wear a blue shirt. To find out what colors complement the main color, you can either select colors that are:

1. Analogous: Directly next to the main color

2. Complementary: Directly across from the main color

3. Triad: Equally spaced from the main color on the color wheel

Triad

Triad

Complementary

Complementary

Analogous

Analogous

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Right Angle 2

Right Angle 2

Right Angle 1

Right Angle 1

4. At a right angle to the main color

5. At a T to the main color

6. At an X to the main color

 

 

 

X

X

 

T

T

Neutral colors that generally go with everything include beige, ivory, taupe, black, gray, and white, and sometimes brown.

Also consider hue, tone, tint, and shade, which can all affect whether your outfit really goes together.

hue tone tint shade

(c) Takeshi Ugajin

Hue is the pure color.

Tone (a.k.a. complement tint) is hue plus either gray or the opposite color, which will mute or “tone” down the color.

Tint is hue plus white, which will lighten the color.

Finally, shade is hue plus black, which will darken the color.

Consider also the possibility of contrast or of monochromatic colors. In the case of contrast, you can use different shades or tints to select colors you might not otherwise have considered—that is, you can combine light and dark colors. For example, to continue with the example of a blue shirt, I might wear a dark blue shirt with khaki pants or a light blue shirt with dark or black pants. Furthermore, there is the possibility of selecting a monochromatic outfit—that is, all the items in your outfit are the same color but different patterns (i.e., some solid and some patterned), different textures, and different shades, tones, or tints. Continuing with the blue shirt example, I could wear a dark blue, patterned, chiffon skirt; a light blue, solid, cotton shirt; a medium blue solid headscarf; a brown belt; and turquoise jewelry.

Okay, that’s it for now. Tune in next week to get the second half of the color scheming lesson!

じゃあまたね!

References:

http://fashionbombdaily.com/2010/04/16/the-color-wheel-how-to-combine-colors-wardrobe-accessories/

http://stylingscrapbook.wordpress.com/2012/03/05/styling-guide-the-color-wheel-and-color-theory/

Rat-a-Tat-Tat Tatting…?

 

a basic tatting shuttle

a basic tatting shuttle

I discovered a new craft. It’s called tatting. Okay, not new to the world (it dates to the early 1800s and apparently, Queen Victoria and Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria enjoyed this craft), but new to me. Basically, the tatter creates intricate lacework by tying different kinds of knots in certain ways using a tool called a shuttle.

The shuttle is a basic tool (pictured left) that seems to me similar to a bobbin but with pointed edges.

artsy tatting shuttles

artsy tatting shuttles

Of course, some really inventive people make decorative shuttles that look like anything from barrettes to Lord of the Rings Elven leather leaves.

Some people believe tatting was invented by sailors, who would create motifs for their girlfriends or wives back home while on long trips. I can understand that assertion for two reasons: (1) sailors would also knit on long voyages in order to pass the time; and (2) tatting apparently takes a really long time to do, which is part of why people don’t do it much anymore.

tatting samples from an instructional booklet circa 1908-1917

tatting samples from an instructional booklet circa 1908-1917

Well, I hope you learned something new today. I certainly did!

じゃあ,またね!